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How to Make Easy Homemade Chicken Stock Recipe

Learn how to make easy homemade chicken stock that’s brimming with flavor. While store-bought stock is convenient, there is something to be said for making your own from scratch.

In the world of culinary magic, few things possess the power to elevate dishes as effortlessly as a well-prepared chicken stock. A hearty foundation for soups, sauces, risottos, and countless other creations, a rich chicken stock can turn a simple meal into a culinary masterpiece.

Whether you’re a novice in the kitchen or a seasoned chef, it is easy to make this soul-warming chicken stock. It will undoubtedly become a staple in your culinary repertoire.

What’s even better are the aromas that fill your kitchen as you gently simmer a mixture of humble ingredients. Transforming them into liquid gold exuding comfort and nourishment.

Let’s embark on a journey to the heart of homemade goodness, where simmering pots and fragrant spices come together to create an elixir that embodies both tradition and innovation.

How to Make Easy Homemade Chicken Stock Recipe

Is it worth making homemade stock?

Absolutely, making homemade stock is well worth the effort. Homemade chicken stock offers a range of benefits that can significantly enhance the flavor and quality of your dishes. Here are a few reasons why you would want to spend the time and energy making your own.

It is richer and more flavorful than store-bought options. You have control over the ingredients, allowing you to customize the flavor to your liking by adjusting the herbs, spices, and vegetables you use.

When you make your own stock, you know exactly what goes into it. You can choose high-quality ingredients, such as organic chicken and fresh vegetables, and avoid additives, preservatives, and excessive sodium found in some commercial stocks.

Make it from leftover chicken bones, a whole chicken carcass, and vegetable scraps, which are often discarded. This makes it a cost-effective way to extract maximum flavor from ingredients you might otherwise throw away.

Stock is a versatile culinary base that can be used in a wide range of recipes, including soups, stews, sauces, gravies, risottos, and more. Having a batch of homemade stock on hand allows you to enhance the depth and complexity of your dishes.

Homemade stock can be more nutrient-rich compared to store-bought versions, as you can control the quality and quantity of ingredients. It can be an excellent source of vitamins, minerals, and collagen, which can have various health benefits.

Making your own allows you to adjust the recipe according to your taste preferences. You can experiment with different herbs, spices, and aromatics to create a stock that aligns perfectly with your culinary style.

How to Store Stock

Fundamental Culinary Skill

Learning to make homemade stock is a fundamental culinary skill that can open doors to other cooking techniques. It teaches you about flavor extraction, balancing ingredients, and the art of slow cooking.

Creating homemade stock from kitchen scraps promotes sustainability by reducing food waste. Instead of discarding vegetable peels, bones, and leftover chicken, you’re using them to create something delicious and useful.

While making your own might take some time and patience, the rewards far outweigh the effort. If you’re looking to take your cooking to the next level and infuse your meals with a touch of homemade goodness, making your own chicken stock is definitely worth it.

What not to do when making stock?

While making stock is generally a straightforward process, there are a few tips and tricks to make sure you’re not making one of these mistakes.

Using Too Much Salt: Avoid adding too much salt to your stock at the beginning. You can always adjust the seasoning later when you use the liquid in your dishes. Adding too much salt early in the process can make your stock overly salty and limit its versatility.

Boiling Instead of Simmering: One of the key principles of making stock is to simmer the ingredients gently over low heat. Boiling stock vigorously can cause it to become cloudy and develop a harsh flavor. In fact, we have made this in a soup kettle and a slow cooker.

Adding Bitter Vegetables: Avoid adding bitter vegetables like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, or turnip greens to your stock. These can impart a bitter taste to the stock, affecting its overall flavor.

Using Too Much Water: While it’s important to cover the ingredients with water, using too much water can dilute the flavor of the stock. Aim for a balance between covering the ingredients and concentrating the flavor.

Overcrowding the Pot: To allow for proper extraction of flavors, avoid overcrowding the pot with too many ingredients. This can result in uneven cooking and flavor distribution.

Not Skimming the Foam: As your stock simmers, foam and impurities might rise to the surface. Skim this foam off with a spoon to help clarify the stock and improve its appearance.

Using Raw, Unwashed Ingredients: Rinse your ingredients, especially bones and vegetables, before using them in the stock. This helps remove excess blood, dirt, and impurities that can cloud the stock.

It’s Sometimes in the Little Touches That Elevate a Recipe

Not Straining Properly: After simmering, strain the stock to remove solids. Use a fine-mesh strainer or cheesecloth to ensure that your stock is clear and free of debris.

Ignoring Fat Skimming: Allow your stock to cool before refrigerating it. This will cause the fat to rise and solidify on the surface, making it easier to skim off and reduce the fat content of the stock.

Stirring Too Much: Avoid stirring the stock excessively during the simmering process. Gentle simmering helps prevent cloudy stock, while stirring can agitate the ingredients and make the stock murkier.

Over-Seasoning: Be cautious with adding strong herbs and spices. Overusing certain herbs or spices can overpower the stock’s flavor profile.

Cooking for Too Long: While simmering is important, excessively long cooking times can break down the flavors and result in a dull, flat-tasting stock.

Allowing Rapid Temperature Changes: Avoid transferring your hot stock directly to the refrigerator. Allow it to cool slightly before refrigerating to prevent temperature shock that could affect the quality.

By being mindful of these common mistakes, you can ensure that your homemade stock turns out flavorful, clear, and ready for your next recipe.

Whole Chicken Carcass in Stock Pot

What is the Difference Between Chicken Stock and Chicken Broth?

They are are both flavorful liquids used as the base for various dishes, but they have distinct differences in terms of their ingredients, preparation methods, and intended uses.

Chicken Stock

Chicken stock is typically made with a higher proportion of bones, often including roasted bones, which contribute to a richer and more gelatinous texture. It also commonly includes aromatics like onions, carrots, and celery, as well as herbs and spices.

Stock is simmered over several hours to get maximum flavor and gelatin from the bones. The longer simmering time results in a thicker, more concentrated liquid with a deep, rich flavor.

Chicken stock tends to have a more of an intense and savory flavor due to the longer cooking time and the use of roasted bones. It is a versatile base for sauces, gravies, and recipes where a deep flavor is desired.

However, the longer cooking time and the presence of bones add to a stock that gels when cooled, giving it a thicker and more viscous texture.

Chicken Broth

Chicken broth is made with a higher proportion of meat and is often cooked with aromatic vegetables, herbs, and spices. It generally has a simpler ingredient profile compared to stock.

Broth is typically simmered for a shorter period of time, usually around an hour, resulting in a lighter, clearer liquid with a milder flavor.

It has a lighter, more delicate flavor compared to stock. It’s well-suited for dishes where a milder flavor is desired, such as simple soups or dishes that require the broth to complement other prominent flavors.

Further, it does not gel as readily as stock due to the shorter cooking time and lower bone content. It has a more liquid consistency.

Chicken broth is often used as a base for clear soups, light sauces, and recipes that require a less pronounced flavor profile. It’s also commonly used for rehydrating grains and adding moisture to dishes.

In summary, while both chicken stock and chicken broth serve as versatile culinary foundations, they differ in terms of flavor intensity, ingredient composition, cooking times, and final uses. The choice between stock and broth depends on the specific requirements of your recipe and the flavor profile you want to achieve.

Slow Cooker Chicken Stock

Make This Recipe in a Stock Pot, Slow Cooker and Instant Pot

Combine Ingredients in the Slow Cooker

Place the chicken bones, chopped vegetables, garlic, bay leaf, peppercorns, parsley stems, and any optional herbs or aromatics into the slow cooker.

Pour in enough water to cover the ingredients in the slow cooker. Be sure not to overfill the slow cooker.

Cover the slow cooker and set it to cook on the low setting. Allow the ingredients to simmer and infuse over 6-8 hours.

Make this Recipe in an Insta Pot

Place the chicken bones, chopped vegetables, garlic, bay leaf, peppercorns, parsley stems, and any optional herbs or aromatics into the Instant Pot.

Pour in enough water to cover the ingredients in the pressure cooker. Be mindful not to exceed the maximum fill line.

Close the Instant Pot lid, set the valve to “Sealing,” and select the “Manual” or “Pressure Cook” setting. Set the timer for 1-2 hours on high pressure, depending on your preference. Longer cooking times result in richer flavor.

Once the cooking time is complete, allow the Instant Pot to naturally release pressure for about 15-20 minutes. Then, carefully switch the valve to “Venting” to release any remaining pressure.

No matter which way you choose to make it…

Strain the Stock

Once the stock has reached your desired flavor, turn off the heat and let it cool slightly. Using a fine mesh strainer or cheesecloth, strain the liquid into a clean container, discarding the solids.

Cool and Store

Allow the strained stock to cool completely before refrigerating or freezing. If storing in the refrigerator, skim off any fat that solidifies on the surface before using or storing.

Chicken Stock vs Vegetable Stock

Chicken stock and vegetable stock are two distinct types of flavorful liquids used in cooking, each with its own unique characteristics, ingredients, and uses. Here’s a comparison of the two.

Chicken

Chicken stock is typically made by simmering chicken bones (such as carcasses or leftover bones from roasted chicken) along with aromatic vegetables (like onions, carrots, and celery), herbs, and spices. The use of bones adds collagen, which contributes to a thicker texture and rich flavor.

It has a deep, savory flavor due to the presence of roasted bones and the long simmering process. It’s known for its ability to enhance the complexity of dishes and provide a hearty foundation.

Versatility and commonly used as a base for a wide range of dishes, including soup recipes, pasta dishes, sauces, and gravy recipes.

Chicken stock has a thicker like a gelatin from the bones during simmering.

The collagen and nutrients from the bones contribute to the nutritional value of chicken stock, providing potential health benefits.

Vegetable Stock

Vegetable stock is made by simmering a variety of vegetables, along with herbs and spices, in water. Common vegetables used include onions, carrots, celery, leeks, garlic, and mushrooms.

Vegetable stock offers a lighter, more delicate flavor compared to chicken stock. It has a fresh and clean taste that complements a variety of vegetarian and vegan dishes.

It is a staple in vegetarian and vegan cooking. It’s used as a base for soups, sauces, and other dishes where a lighter flavor profile is desired. It allows the flavors of the vegetables to shine through.

Vegetable stock does not have the same gelatinous texture as chicken stock because it lacks bones. It’s generally a clear and lighter liquid.

It is low in calories and provides a source of vitamins and minerals from the vegetables used.

Flavorful Stock

Choosing Between Chicken Stock and Vegetable Stock

The choice between chicken stock and vegetable stock depends on the type of dish you’re preparing and your dietary preferences.

If you’re looking to add richness and depth to your dish, especially meat-based dishes, chicken stock is a great choice. On the other hand, if you’re aiming for a lighter, vegetarian, or vegan option, vegetable stock is the way to go.

Both stocks have their own unique qualities that can enhance your culinary creations and elevate the flavors in your cooking.

Health Benefits of Stock

It offers a range of health benefits that go beyond its delightful flavor and culinary versatility.

Rich in essential nutrients and compounds, chicken stock is a nourishing addition to your diet. The slow simmering of bones, cartilage, and aromatics releases collagen, which supports joint health, skin elasticity, and digestive function.

The stock is also a source of minerals like calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus, contributing to bone strength and overall well-being.

Additionally, the amino acids and proteins present in chicken stock aid in muscle repair, immune system support, and the maintenance of healthy hair and nails. Incorporating homemade chicken stock into your meals provides a warm, comforting way to promote overall health and vitality.

Is Chicken Stock Gluten Free?

Chicken stock can be gluten-free, but it depends on how it’s prepared and the specific ingredients used.

Homemade Version

When you make chicken stock from scratch at home, using only chicken bones, vegetables, herbs, and spices, it is likely to be gluten-free. If you avoid adding any ingredients that contain gluten, such as wheat-based thickeners or certain soy sauces containing gluten, your homemade chicken stock should be safe for individuals who need to avoid gluten.

Store-Bought

Some store-bought chicken stocks or broth may contain gluten or gluten-containing additives. It’s important to carefully read the ingredient labels on commercial products to determine whether they are gluten-free.

Ingredients like hydrolyzed wheat protein or modified food starch can sometimes be sources of gluten. Many manufacturers now provide gluten-free labeling on their products to make it easier for individuals with gluten sensitivities or celiac disease to identify safe options.

If you’re following a gluten-free diet, it’s always a good idea to either make your own chicken stock from scratch or choose store-bought options that are explicitly labeled as gluten-free. This ensures that you’re not inadvertently consuming any gluten-containing ingredients.

Homemade Chicken Stock in Quart Containers

How to Store Homemade Stock

Storing properly is essential to maintain its freshness, flavor, and safety.

Allow the chicken stock to cool down before storing it. You can speed up the cooling process by placing the pot in an ice bath or using shallow containers to spread the stock out.

If you plan to use the chicken stock within a few days, store it in the refrigerator. Use airtight containers like glass jars or plastic containers to prevent any contaminants from getting in and to keep the stock from absorbing other fridge odors.

Clearly label the containers with the date you made the stock. This helps you keep track of its freshness and use it before it becomes too old.

Freezing

If you won’t be using the stock within a few days, freezing is a great option. Here’s how:

Use freezer-safe containers or resealable plastic bags designed for freezing. Leave some space at the top of the container or bag to allow for expansion as the stock freezes.

Portion the stock into smaller containers or ice cube trays for convenient thawing and use. This way, you can defrost only the amount you need without thawing the entire batch.

For bags, lay them flat in the freezer until the stock is frozen solid. Once frozen, you can stack the bags for efficient storage.

Label the containers or bags with the date for reference.

Chicken stock can be stored in the freezer for several months. While it’s safe to consume for longer periods, the flavor and quality may start to deteriorate over time.

Thawing and Using

When you’re ready to use the frozen stock, there are a few methods to thaw it safely:

Refrigerator. Place the container in the refrigerator and allow it to thaw slowly over several hours or overnight.

Cold Water. Seal the container in a leak-proof bag and submerge it in cold water. Change the water every 30 minutes to speed up thawing.

Microwave. If you’re in a hurry, you can use the defrost setting on your microwave to thaw smaller portions. Be sure to transfer the stock to a microwave-safe container first.

Properly stored chicken stock can be a lifesaver in the kitchen, providing a flavorful base for soups, sauces, and more. Just remember to prioritize cleanliness, label your containers, and be mindful of storage times to ensure your stock stays safe and delicious.

How to Make Easy Homemade Chicken Stock Recipe
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How to Make Easy Homemade Chicken Stock Recipe

Learn how to make easy homemade chicken stock that’s brimming with flavor. While store-bought stock is convenient, there is something to be said for making your own from scratch.
Prep Time15 minutes
Cook Time2 hours
Total Time2 hours 15 minutes
Course: sauce
Cuisine: American
Keyword: budget recipe, chicken recipe, cooking tips, how to cook, rotisserie chicken recipe
Servings: 8 cups
Calories: 15kcal

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Ingredients

  • 2-3 Pounds Chicken Bones 2 chicken carcasses or leftover bones from a roasted chicken
  • 1 Medium Onion peeled and quartered
  • 2 Carrots washed and chopped
  • 2 Salks Celery washed and chopped
  • 4 Cloves Garlic smashed
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • 1 Teaspoon Whole Peppercorns
  • 10 Cups Water enough to cover the ingredients
  • A handful of fresh parsley stems
  • Optional: other herbs and aromatics like thyme rosemary, or leeks

Instructions

  • Gather your chicken bones and any vegetable scraps you have on hand. Give the vegetables a quick wash and chop them into rough pieces.

Roast Chicken Bones (Optional)

  • If you have time, you can enhance the flavor by roasting the chicken bones in a 400°F (200°C) oven for about 20-30 minutes until they’re golden brown. This step is optional but can add depth to your stock.
  • In a large stockpot, combine the roasted bones (if using), chopped vegetables, garlic, bay leaf, peppercorns, parsley stems, and any other herbs you choose.
  • Add Water and Simmer
  • Pour in enough water to cover the ingredients in the pot. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer over medium-low heat. Avoid boiling, as this can cloud the stock. Skim off any foam or impurities that rise to the surface.
  • Let the stock simmer for at least 2-4 hours, occasionally skimming the surface to maintain clarity. The longer you simmer, the more flavor and nutrients will be extracted from the ingredients.
  • Once the stock has reached your desired flavor, turn off the heat and let it cool slightly. Using a fine mesh strainer or cheesecloth, strain the liquid into a clean container, discarding the solids.
  • Allow the strained stock to cool completely before refrigerating or freezing. If storing in the refrigerator, skim off any fat that solidifies on the surface before using or storing.

Your Own Private Notes

Notes

You can adjust the ingredients and seasonings according to your taste preferences.
Feel free to experiment with different herbs and vegetables to customize the flavor of your stock.

Make This in a Slow Cooker

Combine Ingredients in the Slow Cooker:

Place the chicken bones, chopped vegetables, garlic, bay leaf, peppercorns, parsley stems, and any optional herbs or aromatics into the slow cooker.
Pour in enough water to cover the ingredients in the slow cooker. Be sure not to overfill the slow cooker.
Cover the slow cooker and set it to cook on the low setting. Allow the ingredients to simmer and infuse over 6-8 hours.

Use an Instant Pot

Combine Ingredients in the Instant Pot:
Place the chicken bones, chopped vegetables, garlic, bay leaf, peppercorns, parsley stems, and any optional herbs or aromatics into the Instant Pot.
Pour in enough water to cover the ingredients in the Instant Pot. Be mindful not to exceed the maximum fill line.
Close the Instant Pot lid, set the valve to “Sealing,” and select the “Manual” or “Pressure Cook” setting. Set the timer for 1-2 hours on high pressure, depending on your preference. Longer cooking times result in richer flavor.
Once the cooking time is complete, allow the Instant Pot to naturally release pressure for about 15-20 minutes. Then, carefully switch the valve to “Venting” to release any remaining pressure.

How to Store Chicken Stock

Storing properly is essential to maintain its freshness, flavor, and safety.
Allow the chicken stock to cool down before storing it. You can speed up the cooling process by placing the pot in an ice bath or using shallow containers to spread the stock out.
If you plan to use the chicken stock within a few days, store it in the refrigerator. Use airtight containers like glass jars or plastic containers to prevent any contaminants from getting in and to keep the stock from absorbing other fridge odors.
Clearly label the containers with the date you made the stock. This helps you keep track of its freshness and use it before it becomes too old.

Freezing

If you won’t be using the stock within a few days, freezing is a great option. Here’s how:
Use freezer-safe containers or resealable plastic bags designed for freezing. Leave some space at the top of the container or bag to allow for expansion as the stock freezes.
Portion the stock into smaller containers or ice cube trays for convenient thawing and use. This way, you can defrost only the amount you need without thawing the entire batch.
For bags, lay them flat in the freezer until the stock is frozen solid. Once frozen, you can stack the bags for efficient storage.
Label the containers or bags with the date for reference.
Chicken stock can be stored in the freezer for several months. While it’s safe to consume for longer periods, the flavor and quality may start to deteriorate over time.

Thawing and Using

When you’re ready to use the frozen stock, there are a few methods to thaw it safely:
Refrigerator. Place the container in the refrigerator and allow it to thaw slowly over several hours or overnight.
Cold Water. Seal the container in a leak-proof bag and submerge it in cold water. Change the water every 30 minutes to speed up thawing.
Microwave. If you’re in a hurry, you can use the defrost setting on your microwave to thaw smaller portions. Be sure to transfer the stock to a microwave-safe container first.
Properly stored chicken stock can be a lifesaver in the kitchen, providing a flavorful base for chicken soup, sauces, and more. Just remember to prioritize cleanliness, label your containers, and be mindful of storage times to ensure your stock stays safe and delicious.

Nutrition

Calories: 15kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 0.4g | Fat: 0.1g | Saturated Fat: 0.02g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.03g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0.01g | Sodium: 26mg | Potassium: 83mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 2553IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 22mg | Iron: 0.2mg

AboutVictoria

You can find Victoria crocheting, quilting, and creating recipes. She has cooked in restaurants for over 20 years, including many larger parties. In her professional career, she has worked in management in a wide variety of businesses including higher education as a dean of a division. All the while attending college part-time to achieve her doctorate in higher education with an emphasis in e-learning.

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